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Knowledge Base

How do you help your child discover his or her talents?
1 - The family atmosphere must be interconnected, so that love and affection are the atmosphere in the family life, through a close relationship between the father and mother & brothers and sisters, the atmosphere helps the child to enrich his social development.
 
2. Expand the field through family social training, the child starts the training process since childhood to establish social relations with relatives of both parties.
 
3 - Train your son and encourage him since the young age to expand the circle of knowledge, and encourage him to make new friends, and teaching skills to maintain old friendships.
 
4 - accompanying the father his son and his participation in family and social activities ; so that the son feels safe with his father, and follow him.
 
5 – Give  your son some space away from you, and give him some freedom; to be careful , to discover himself away from pressure or shame.
 
6 – expose your son to the new things, and help him with tips and things that help him to build his personality independently.
 
7 - Watch him from a far, without interfering in his affairs, he is in the most need for your psychological support and trust in him, even if he did not show it that he needs you.
 
8 - Stay away from criticism, once you feel your distance and your criticism of him, you find him running away and away, becomes moody, permanent boredom and depression, many exit , objection , introversion and isolation, does not accept advice and criticism, do what he wants, he does not respond to any pressure or orders, In which the hormones of his body change, and are influenced by his temperament, his psychology and his needs.
 
9 - Teach him to accept criticism and the other opinion, and how to listen and listen and accept opinions contrary to him, and appreciate the feelings of others, teach him how to accept the criticism directed at him

The CEF is a guideline used to describe achievements of learners of foreign languages across Europe. It was put together by the Council of Europe as the main part of the project “Language Learning for European Citizenship” between 1989 and 1996. Its main aim is to provide a method of assessing and teaching which applies to all languages in Europe.
 
Target level A – Basic User
A1: Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
A2: Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
Target level B – Independent User
B1: Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
B2: Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
Target level C – Proficient User
C1: Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.
C2: Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarize information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.

The CEF is a guideline used to describe achievements of learners of foreign languages across Europe. It was put together by the Council of Europe as the main part of the project “Language Learning for European Citizenship” between 1989 and 1996. Its main aim is to provide a method of assessing and teaching which applies to all languages in Europe.
 
Target level A – Basic User
A1: Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
A2: Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
Target level B – Independent User
B1: Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
B2: Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
Target level C – Proficient User
C1: Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognize implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.
C2: Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarize information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.

The programmer is the person who writes the code. Programming is the production of programs that perform certain functions using a specific programming language.
 
Choose the programming language you learn and operate by field:
Desktop application programmer
Mobile application programmer for mobile applications
Website / Web application development
Embedded Systems Programmer
 
There is a lot of programming languages to choose from :
C & C ++
java
PHP
python
C#
 
You need to keep a specific track/field where you want to be:
 
Mobile application programmer for mobile applications :
it depends on the type of mobile and operating system used whether it is Android Operating system or IOS operating system, for example, Android programming language works with Java and the IOS works with Swift or Objective C .
 
Website / Web application development :
 It is also possible to use any Java, Python, or PHP programming language
You can start according to the field in which you are specialized, so that you can complete your development in the programming language you have chosen from the beginning .
 
Desktop Application Programming
Microsoft’s language C# are always recommended to be used but it is also possible to use other languages like Java.
 
 
Embedded Systems Programmer
It is used for microcontrollers and the programming mechanism of electronic devices .

The criteria to achieve your target and make successful sales  is:
 
First, the gradation or taking into consideration the history of sales (History)... Also, the sale is not that you target a million per month And your sales of the previous month was 30 thousand
 
Second, the target has to be challenging ... It must be difficult to reach, but not impossible, and sometimes by putting a benchmark, it is possible to be one of the competitors or to be a clever sales representative who achieves a certain number to the company compared to other sales people ....
 
Third, the target has to be a reasonable number ... It means not too far or impossible to achieve for a sales representative which may not be achieved due to desperation. Also it hasn’t be very easy, so the team relaxes and does not reach it due to carelessness .
 
Fourth: The distribution of workloads ... One of the best modern methods in sales management is the distribution of target achievement according to the strength of the sales team members with the recognition of the top performers with higher commissions suitable for their abilities .
 
Fifth: the product or company life cycle ... If the product in the growth stage so  the sales target is  doubled every month, but if a product in the stage of stability keeps the increase in the range of simple from 20% to 40% per year , as well as the company itself . if it is a startup company or an old and stable company.
 
Sixth, taking into consideration the learning curve and experience of the sales personnel (Learning Curve) ... And of course because their knowledge that enables them achieve good sales the product first month, for example, after 3 months not after a year .. For example, keep the first month, for example, without target and after 3 months the target varies after a year .
 
Seventh: Be process oriented ... The numbers are not the only standard for the success of sales, put in consideration the review of sales operations , the way and form of presentations , the way of  talking with customers and the policy of pricing ....
 
 
 
Eighth , The time to close the deal  (Sales Cycle) .... Period from the beginning of customer contact and even payment of funds, which varies from industry to other and from a company to another and from a product to another ... for example , selling clothes in a clothes store can take 10 minutes while closing a deal with 5 million USD can take over six months .
 
Ninth: The target has to be flexible ... It means to be possible to be altered according to market conditions up and down and it is possible to set the target every month or every 3 months or every 6 months or every year depending on the industry and according to the company and also according to the product location in the Product life cycle .
 
Tenth: to take into consideration the target production capacity of the company or the foundation ... for example you can never make an offer without studying it’s impact otherwise it will fire back towards the product and the company.

Time or Term deposit accounts are one option available to investors who want to get more out of their savings. Time deposits are a fixed term investment which means that your money is ‘locked away’ until the end of the term when it reaches maturity.

Depending on the specific Certificates of Deposit that you have, these instruments usually get periodic interest rate payments. This can be as often as a monthly, quarterly, or annual payments. Interest is either fixed or compounded. Compounding involves the timing of interest calculation (or payment). A CD that pays interest only once a year will yield (in a year) only the exact amount of interest paid. When interest is paid several times a year, the yield total is the sum of the interest from each payment. Because the interest paid during the year earns interest in the account just as the original deposit does, compounded yield is greater than the yield for a once-a-year calculation.

In order to see if a CD is the best investment for you:
1. Determine when you will need all or part of your cash. Will you need to access this if times get tough? Can you safely leave the amount you plan to invest for the entire time you take out the CD?
2. What do you think will happen to interest rates? If you think that rates are rising (which usually happens during inflation) invest in a short term CD. That way, if rates do rise, you can take advantage of the higher rates. On the other hand, if you think that rates are falling (usually when the economy is on a down swing), a longer-term CD is better. This way you lock in a fixed rate and if the rates are further reduced you will still be earning a higher rate. It is always important to look at investments in both the long and short term. Also, you need to be aware of the broader economic climate around the world.
Again, if you withdraw your money before the CD comes due, you will incur a substantial penalty. If you are at all uncertain regarding the length of time you can invest you might use a technique called laddering (more advanced).
Laddering
Instead of investing all your money at one time, you divide your total available cash into equal parts and invest each part in CDs of varying duration. For example, you want to invest EGP 3,000 in a CD. Instead, you invest EGP 1,000 in a one-year CD, EGP 1,000 in a two-year CD, and EGP 1,000 in a three-year CD. Each time one of the CDs matures, you can either take the cash (penalty free—since it has matured) or re-invest it in another three-year CD to keep your ladder in place.

Usually if you make a partial or complete money withdrawal before the Time Deposit comes due, you will incur a substantial penalty.

A savings account is one of the simplest types of bank accounts available to consumers. It lets you store cash securely with an insured bank or credit union and earn returns on the balance.
Cash kept in a savings account is a bit less accessible than cash kept in a checking account, which you can generally withdraw without restrictions. 
In your search for the best savings account, here are some factors to keep in mind:

Rates: 
Among accounts that provide earnings, a certificate of deposit, or CD, generally delivers better rates than a regular savings account. However, these certificates also have fixed terms and can impose early withdrawal penalties. Unlike CDs, which typically pay a return at a set rate, the yield on a savings account can change based on economic or market factors or even because of new policies initiated by the financial institution involved.

Account minimums: 
Accounts with high daily or monthly minimum-balance requirements tend to offer better rates of return than those with no or lower minimums, but you can still find high-yield accounts without this requirement. Bear in mind that dipping below a minimum can trigger a fee.

Initial deposits: 
Some accounts require a specific minimum amount of money to open. You don’t necessarily have to maintain a minimum balance each month, but read the terms of an account so you know what to expect.

Checking accounts are some of the simplest – and least lucrative – financial products out there. They’re the best vehicle for actually using and spending your money, but as an investment tool, checking accounts usually offer low interest rates (or even zero interest rate) compared to savings accounts, CDs, and other places where you can grow your cash.
Generally speaking, you should only use your checking account for money that you need to easily access for monthly bills and everyday purchases.

The bottom line is this: 
If you need a place to put cash you don’t need right away and don’t want to tie it up in a Time Deposit or CD, a savings account can be the best choice.  
On the other hand, If you want higher interest and you don't want liquidity in the short-term, then you should definitely seek time deposits or CDs.

You need to ask your bank to issue the number of cheque books you require for your transactions. It usually takes a few days to get them ready for you to pick up.

1. ATM Fees: Any bank that doesn’t have branches won’t have many ATM machines. Assume you’ll be hit with a fee from a visiting bank — usually around EGP 10 per withdrawal— for using an ATM that’s not part of your bank’s network.
2. Account Minimum Fees: Many banks charge you a monthly fee if your balance is below a certain amount.
3. Cheque Book Fee: You will need to pay a small amount of money when asking for a new cheque book.

Experts agree that anyone interested in saving for the future should have a savings account. Savings accounts allow people to build savings over time, while providing a solid foundation for future financial stability.

One of the best uses for a savings account is its use as an emergency fund for unexpected expenses, such as a car purchase or repair, home maintenance expenses and medical deductibles or bills. Using the cash in an emergency fund, rather than a credit card, avoids having to pay interest in the event that the balance is not paid off immediately. Financial experts recommend that a savings account hold a balance equal to three to six months of living expenses to cover financial emergencies.

Savings accounts allow people to save for big ticket items, such as a vacation or a down payment for a new home, in manageable, incremental amounts. By looking at the length of time you have to save and the amount needed, people can systematically save a specified amount of money to reach their goal.

Savings accounts are an excellent way to teach children how to manage money at an early age. Many banks have special accounts just for children that reward them for saving. Some experts feel that by opening a kid’s savings account that parents or grandparents can create lifelong savers.

There are generally five things to consider when choosing a bank saving account.
1. Interest rates. Is the interest rate competitive relative to other banks? Are you happy with the rate? How often does the rate change?
2. Traditional or on-line? Are you comfortable banking with an institution that you can only access by computer or phone? Do you like having physical access to bank representative if you have questions or issues with your account? Is it important to have all your accounts in one place?
3. Convenience. How easy is it to do business with your financial institution of choice? If you opt for a traditional bank in your area, do they have convenient business hours? Are they close to your home or place of business? If you are using an on-line bank with an ATM feature, are their ATM’s nearby?
4. ATM’s. Regardless of the type of bank you choose, if you will be withdrawing funds via an ATM, are there fees associated with the use of the card? Does the bank have a large network of ATM machines near your home, your work?
5. Restrictions on the account. Be sure to know all about the restrictions on the bank's saving account. Many accounts limit the number of withdrawals or transfers that can be made in a month or that can be made without incurring a fee. Some accounts also charge fees if the account balance goes below a set level. Any restrictions should be clearly stated in the paperwork associated with opening the account.
Savings accounts are a convenient and safe way to save money. While they do not pack the investment return of a mutual fund, they do provide a convenient, safe and consistent way to save.

A Mortage is a loan taken out to buy property or land. They are usually of longer term and larger size than other types of loans like personal loans. The loan is ‘secured’ against the value of your home until it’s paid off. If you can’t keep up your repayments the lender can repossess (take back) your home and sell it so they get their money back.

A Mortage makes home ownership affordable:
The main purpose of taking a Mortage is increasing affordability. If you can afford to pay EGP 250,000 in cash, you can put this as a down payment and borrow to afford something larger or in a nicer area. Don’t stretch yourself if you think you’ll struggle to keep up repayments – use this affordability calculator to see how much you can really afford in monthly payments.

A Mortage can protect you from inflation and help you create wealth:
In a high inflation environment, borrowing works to your advantage as you fix your payments at today’s prices but the real asset would typically appreciate in value increasing your home equity (market price – outstanding debt).

A Mortage is a cost-effective way of borrowing:
Interest rates on Mortages tend to be lower than any other form of borrowing because the loan is secured against your property. This means the lender has the security that if it all goes wrong and you can’t repay it there is still something valuable – your property – to sell to pay back some if not all the Mortage.

You can apply for a Mortage directly from a bank or Mortage finance companies, choosing from their product range.

You can get a Mortage to finance up to 90% of the unit value for tenures up to 20 Years. While the loan is secured against the property, lenders and you should be comfortable that you can keep up the monthly instalments. Remember that those instalments are calculated based on an interest rate that moves so if interest rates rise, your payments will rise as well. You need to factor that in your calculations. Lenders will want to see proof of your income and certain expenditure, and if you have any debts. They may ask for information about household bills, child maintenance and personal expenses.
Lenders want proof that you will be able to keep up repayments if interest rates rise. They may refuse to offer you a Mortage if they don’t think you’ll be able to afford it.

Mortages come with various costs involved; you should consider all costs before deciding to apply for a Mortage:

Mortage Repayment:
By far, this is the largest cost to consider. How much you pay on your Mortage each month depends on how much you’ve borrowed, the duration of the Mortage and interest rates. It’s worth bearing this all in mind when deciding on the size of your Mortage.

Your monthly repayments will usually be lower as you increase the duration of your Mortage, but the overall total cost will still be higher. For example, if you borrow EGP 200,000 for 10 years at 14%, you will pay around EGP 3,105 in instalments monthly and will repay a total of EGP 372,639 over the 10 years. If you extend this to 20 years, Your monthly payment will go down to EGP 2,487 but your total payments over 20 years would be EGP 596,890

Upfront Mortage fees:
There are a range of other fees that vary according to personal circumstances and the provider. You may or may not pay all or some of those fees.
You may be charged a Mortage set-up fee . This fee is usually put towards booking the Mortage and reserving a limited special rate deal.

The Mortage arrangement fee:
Will likely be the largest of the additional Mortage costs. Most Mortages will have a Mortage arrangement fee, but the cost of it will depend on the lender and interest rate charged.

The Mortage account fee:
Covers the cost of setting up, the maintenance and closing down of your account.

The valuation fee:
Will sometimes be offered by lenders for free. This service ensures that the property value is worth the Mortage amount.

The telegraphic transfer fee:
Will be charged by the lender for transferring the Mortage money to the seller.

How much can you borrow depends on several factors some relates to you and some are lender specific. Shop around as lender specific rules could vary significantly. Generally, the most important elements to consider are:
• Deposit and loan to value (LTV) ratio – The size of your deposit will determine your LTV and ultimately your repayments
• Monthly repaymentsThe most important figure in a Mortage are the monthly repayments, as that’s what you’ll need to pay each month
• Affordability criteria – When you approach a Mortage provider they will assess whether you can afford the Mortage
• Your credit score – Your credit score is vital for any borrowing you want
Loan to value (LTV) ratio: Loan to value ratio is the ratio of how much you want to borrow to the market value of the property you want to buy; logically, The higher your deposit, the lower the ratio. This is one of the big deciders for how much you can borrow and how expensive your Mortage will be. Loans with higher LTV tends to be fewer and more expensive. Consider what would be the biggest deposit amount you can afford.
Monthly repayments: Before you approach a lender, you should consider if you can comfortably meet the potential monthly Mortage repayments for the sum you need to borrow. This is more important than getting the biggest Mortage possible. It will be the size of the repayments that will decide whether you can afford your Mortage on an ongoing basis. If you think the repayments put too much strain on your budget, then chances are you wont be able to borrow that much. Our Mortage comparison (link) enables you to see the different monthly repayments you could have with different Mortages or different amounts. Make sure to plan for the future as interest rates will affect the size of your repayments.

When deciding whether or not to lend to you most Mortage providers will assess your financial circumstances:
What’s your income? Your income is key to the decision of how much a Mortage provider is willing to lend. You will need to be able to prove your declared income with payslips or other official documents.
If your household has two incomes these could in some cases be combined together and you might be able to afford a larger Mortage. Typically, the bank would consider only regular income (like salary) when calculating your affordability but some banks might consider other income as well.
What are your outgoings? Mortage lenders will often also consider your outgoings when deciding how much to offer you. These include things like:
• Existing monthly repayments for loans and credit cards
• Childcare costs (or maintenance payments) , school fees,..etc.
Your credit score: Your credit score is very important in determining your eligibility for any form of borrowing, and Mortages are no exception. All providers will thoroughly examine your credit report and make their decision based on your score. Checking your credit report is important before applying for a Mortage, as you can check for errors and correct any you may find. If you have a poor credit score you can also discover the cause and take steps to improve your credit score.

A car loan is similar to a personal loan but is specific for buying a car which also acts as a guarantee for the loan – if you fail to keep up the payments regularly, the lender has the right to repossess the car, sell it, and use the proceeds to repay any remaining loan amount, missed payment, penalties and administrative charges.

Because of the additional security for the lender vs an unsecured cash loan, car loans should carry a slightly lower interest rate.

In order to secure the asset until the entire debt has been repaid, the lender would typically restrict your ability to sell the car to a third party without their approval. The lender would also typically require that you take a comprehensive insurance policy with them as a beneficiary to protect the asset (the car) in case of accidents or theft. Some lenders would offer you an insurance policy at a discounted rate or even a free insurance policy in some cases. When considering your total cost of borrowing, you should consider the insurance cost as well.

In most cases, the sales person would be selling you a loan offered by one of the banks they work with. Like any sales person, there is a good chance he is pushing the product with the highest commission for him/her. Shop around first using our car loan comparison and make a decision. Make sure to get the best price for the car independent of the loan then compare the loans using this tool:
Example. Agent A is offering the car for EGP 120,000 with 10% down and the rest on 60 months paying EGP 2,500 per month. Using this calculator, it turns out the Annual Equivalent interest rate on this loan is 14.7%. You can check here to see if you can do better from another provider.
Alternatively, check the lowest car price for a cash buy. If , say you found it at another dealer for EGP 115,000; You will still need to put 10% down (EGP 11,500) and borrow the balance (EGP 103,500). You can find the available loans in the market here and compare them to the monthly instalment of EGP 2,500 the dealer is offering you.
Do not forget to add the cost of insurance – you can find loans with free insurance here.

A personal instalment loan is a type of loan that lets you borrow a specific amount of money which you have to pay for over a period of time. Personal instalment loans have a fixed interest and fixed monthly repayments so that makes it easy to plan your budget. The length of time needed to pay the loan can be as short as a year to as long as 7 years. This gives you the ability to bring down the cost of your monthly payment.
Since this is a multipurpose loan, you can use the money that you borrowed for a variety of reasons. The choice is up to you!
Typically, a personal loan would be unsecured; the bank would need to see that you can pay the monthly installments of course so you need to provide proof of income – typically pay slips and/or employment letter with details of your salary. It is not necessary to transfer your salary to the bank but it might help.
You may be asked to secure a loan by giving the lending party something as a guarantee that you will repay the amount. If you asked for a loan to buy a car, for example, the car may be used as security. If you defaulted on your repayments, the lending party could repossess and sell the car to recoup their money. If you took out a loan for another reason, such as a holiday, then the lending party may ask for something else as security or allow you to enter an unsecured loan contract.

When deciding whether or not to lend to you most Mortage providers will assess your financial circumstances:
What’s your income?
Your income is key to the decision of how much a Mortage provider is willing to lend. You will need to be able to prove your declared income with payslips or other official documents. If your household has two incomes these could in some cases be combined together and you might be able to afford a larger Mortage. Typically, the bank would consider only regular income (like salary) when calculating your affordability but some banks might consider other income as well.
What are your outgoings? Mortage lenders will often also consider your outgoings when deciding how much to offer you. These include things like:
• Existing monthly repayments for loans and credit cards
• Childcare costs (or maintenance payments) , school fees,..etc.
Your credit score:
Your credit score is very important in determining your eligibility for any form of borrowing, and Mortages are no exception. All providers will thoroughly examine your credit report and make their decision based on your score. Checking your credit report is important before applying for a Mortage, as you can check for errors and correct any you may find. If you have a poor credit score you can also discover the cause and take steps to improve your credit score.

Fixed interest rate remains fixed during the lifetime of the loan which ensures a fixed monthly installment. i.e. 20% per annum on a loan of EGP 100,000 for a period of 5 years, the monthly installment will be LE 3,043 over 60 months.

A Variable interest rate on the contrary is an additional rate on a base rate decided by the Central Bank. For example, 3% above the Central Bank's announced lending rate. Today the lending rate is 17.75%, therefore the interest rate on the loan is 20.75% (17.75 + 3). However, if the central bank changed the lending rate to 15% forexample, the interest rate would be 18% (15 + 3) and therefore the monthly installment will change with the interest rate. So, If you decide to borrow money at a variable rate, you need to be aware of this point in order to make sure that you're capable of paying your installments on time
Does that mean the fixed interest is better?

Not necessarily, If you think that the interest rates might go down during the coming period, then the variable rate is better for you.  And if you see that the interest rates might increase, then the fixed rate is better.

The declining interest rate is the price that reflects the real cost of the loan

In a simplified way, if you borrow money to pay for something that will increase in value in the future, then this would be a good reason to borrow:

Qarenhom.com is not a bank, it's a comparison platform that enables you to compare between the different banks.  You also get to know their product features, requirements, and you can calculate your monthly loan installments.  You can easily do this at your convenience without being bothered by sales people all over you.  We will send your information to the bank who will followup with you on your request.

The decision is 100% for the bank you selected and the decision is based on your credit score. Of course, every bank has its own rules and requirements, in addition to general rules issued by the central bank which are binding on all banks.

The credit report (I-Score), includes your credit history like the loans and credit cards you applied for in all banks.

In simple terms, a credit card enables an individual (who must be 18 or over) to quickly and easily access a pre-agreed credit line with a financial institution of their choice. This might be their bank, another rival bank, or a specialist credit card issuer. Card holders can access the available balance of their credit limit wherever the payee (e.g. shop) has agreed to accept payments via the credit card processing platform with which their card is associated (MasterCard, Visa, American Express).

In theory, anyone aged 18 and over can apply to obtain a credit card, and there are a great number of issuers vying for business. However, issuers are under no obligation to offer anyone credit and applicants are often refused.

Reasons for credit card rejection are many and varied, but tend to be associated with the potential risk of 'bad debt' or 'default' that applicants expose the issuer to. If card holders fail to pay back the balance of their card, the issuing financial institution is effectively left 'out of pocket'.
Issuers all have specific procedures to attempt to recover monies owed, but this can be a costly and difficult process. It makes far better economic sense for credit card issuers to reject applicants they deem to be a potential risk when they apply for a product.
Given that every individual applicant poses different risks, it would be impossible for issuers to understand every piece of information pertinent to a credit application. To help make these complex decisions and select the best prospects for their business, credit card issuers rely on sophisticated statistical models and algorithms. These analyse different data points relating to a consumer's circumstances, lifestyle factors, demographics and past credit history (or lack thereof), and then draw comparisons with other individuals in similar positions for whom they do have data.
Using these models, card issuers can quickly, and reasonably accurately, judge whether a credit application poses a greater or lesser risk to their business, and whether the customer should be accepted or rejected for a particular product. It is worth remembering that different products have different acceptance criteria, some even specifically tailor credit cards for people with bad credit history.
It is also worth noting that a bad credit history does not necessarily mean outright rejection, even for some cards considered to be aimed at people with good credit scores.
Credit card issuers are in business to make money, and often those who make them the most money are individuals who do not have a perfect credit history and therefore incur charges. What is arguably more important is that individuals are deemed likely to repay the monies borrowed and any associated charges – so the lending financial institution (bank or dedicated card issuer) does not lose money.

Before consumers start using payment cards to make transactions, payment processing businesses have reached agreements with different retailers and service providers to ensure that they are willing to accept card payments for purchases.
Today most stores and service providers in the UK accept payment cards (even more so now as sales people 'on the road' can use card readers, which link to smart phones enabling payment processing anywhere a mobile signal is strong enough), but it was not always this way. Only recently did card transactions overtake traditional cash purchases and many, especially older individuals, will remember a time when finding stores which accepted payment cards was a hit-and-miss process (even high street giant, Marks & Spencer did not accept credit cards until 2001).
Beyond the store networks and infrastructure required to facilitate transactions, card holders are required to have the physical cards themselves.
Every credit card bears the name of the holder, together with a unique number (typically allocated in the ISO/IEC 7812 format) associated with the individual personally liable for the debt incurred on that card. Cards also bear the logo of the payment processing company who connect the receiver of funds with the institution and account liable for payment.
These 3 pieces of data are essentially all that is required to facilitate credit card payments.

In a perfect world, the card holder's name, unique card number and processing platform would enable all transactions to be completed, but to protect themselves against theft and fraud, credit card issuers also include a number of additional security features within the physical card. These security features include:
• Issue & Expiry date
• Signature Strip
• Hologram
• CSC Number
• Chip (or integrated circuit card - ICC)
• Magnetic Strip
• Holder photo There is also information not recorded on the card itself, but to be memorised by the card holder, in the form of a 4 digit PIN number.
Online purchases often require additional enhanced security information (as a physical card is often not required), in the form of passwords, knowledge of the physical address with which the card is associated, personal information pertaining to the holder of the account, and sometimes encrypted data retrieved from a personal card reader.
Most credit card companies also monitor card transactions; overlaying algorithmic models to identify anomalous transactions. These could include:
• Purchases in unexpected locations - especially when other card activity appears to show the account holder in a different place;
• Purchases for unusual or disproportionately high amounts;
• Purchases attempted from IP addresses previously associated with credit card fraud;
• A high number of purchases - especially if they are online.
Card issuers undertake all of these measures because it is ultimately they who lose out when credit card fraud occurs. This is because the burden of proof pertaining to whether transactions were authorised by the credit card holder falls on the issuer of the card. Where issuers cannot prove that the card holder authorised a particular transaction, the amount must be credited back. The only exception to this rule is in the case of customer negligence, so card holders should remember to fiercely guard their personal data and cards, and report the loss or theft of a card as soon as they discover it.

Once a transaction has been completed using a credit card, the amount is debited from the card holder's account, and their credit limit is adjusted to reflect the purchase on their account. The value of the funds drawn from the credit line is called the 'account balance'. This is where the term 'balance' from the ever popular 'balance transfer' cards comes from.
Card holders can continue to make additional purchases on their credit card until they reach their 'credit limit', at which point they have reached their maximum balance.

Every month, credit card issuers are obliged to send their account holders a statement detailing the charges they have incurred during the prior month (the amounts and payees), as well as any balance rolled over from prior months and interest charges thereon. It also details the minimum amount payable on the balance, and the date by which the payment must be cleared (n.b. payments should be made a few days before this date to ensure they have cleared by the specified date).
If the account balance is paid in full every month, then no interest will be incurred on it. If the balance is not cleared then the remaining balance (the original balance minus deductions for payments made) will start incurring interest at the rate detailed in the credit agreement (or subsequent correspondence).
Where a card holder has opted to take advantage of an introductory offer, the terms of this deal will supersede standard interest payments. For example, an individual on a 0% balance transfer deal will pay no interest on the balance they have transferred until the end of the specified introductory period, unless they break the terms of the arrangement, e.g. they miss a minimum payment or make that payment later than required.

Credit card issuers, and the processing businesses that deliver the technical infrastructure required to make payments, have to make money and there are a number of ways in which they do this:
Interchange Fees
To accept payments from credit and debit cards the payee must agree to pay the processor of the payments an 'interchange' fee - which is typically included in the standard price of goods or services, although not always.
Because the interchange fee tends to be charged as a percentage of the total purchase price, retailers of high value goods or services (where there is particular price sensitivity or competitive pressure) sometimes charge the consumer directly for the interchange, rather than spreading the costs across everything they sell ('low cost' airlines are a prime example of this).

  • Interest Charges: Individuals who do not clear their balance in full every month, and who are not on a particular introductory deal, are charged interest every month on their credit card balance. Although the amounts can seem small on a monthly basis, the actual interest rates charged are often in double digits and the costs can soon mount up for people only paying their minimum payment every month.
  • Other Fees & Charges Failure to meet certain pre-determined objectives (like paying the minimum payment on time) can result in card holders incurring additional fees and charges such as late payment charges and fees for notification letters. More worryingly perhaps, if the issuer has enough cause for concern they may deem it necessary to increase the interest charged to the customer in line with the perceived risk they pose to the business (remember most interest rates are 'variable'). Consumers may discover the interest charge and the amount they owe can creep up much quicker than they expected.
  • Additional Services Credit card businesses also make money by selling additional services to their customers.

A credit card is a bit like a chain saw -- it's a very handy tool, but it's capable of inflicting horrendous damage if used improperly. The same advice applies to both of them -- choose the right tool for the job, and follow the safety rules
Here are six things to consider before you select a credit card:
1. Spending habits
The first question to be answered is how you intend to use the card. Are you the kind of person who will pay off the card every month without fail, or do you anticipate carrying a balance from month to month? Are you going to use it to pay for everything, or just for emergencies? • If you're going to pay the bill in full every month, then the interest rate doesn't really matter to you. Look for a card with no annual fee and a longer grace period so you don't get hit with a finance charge. • If you're going to carry a balance, you want the lowest possible interest rate and a low introductory rate. • If this is going to be your go-to-card for most of what you buy, look for a card with a generous credit limit and a solid rewards program. • If it's only going to be used for emergencies, go for a no-frills card with a low interest rate and low fees.
2. The interest rate
On a credit card offer, the interest rate appears as the APR, or annual percentage rate. It can either be a fixed rate or a variable rate that is tied to another financial indicator, most commonly a rate set by the central bank. With a fixed-rate card, you know what the interest rate will be from month to month; a card with a variable rate can fluctuate. However, even a card with a fixed interest rate can change based on certain triggers, such as paying your card -- or any card -- late, or going over your limit. Or because the credit card issuer decides to change it. Yes, they really can do that; they just have to notify you.
3. Credit limit
This is the amount of money that the credit card issuer is willing to let you borrow. Depending on your credit history, it could be anything from a few hundred pounds to tens of thousands of pounds. You don't want a situation in which you're close to maxing out your credit limit. It can hurt your credit score -- and some credit card issuers have cut customers' credit limits to an amount that's lower than their current balance. Adding insult to injury, there's a penalty when that happens.
4. Fees and penalties
There are several charges associated with credit cards usage. Common charges include fees for transactions, such as balance transfers and cash advances, or for asking to increase your credit limit or make a payment by phone. There also are penalty charges for paying your bill late or going over your credit limit. Always compare those fees and watch out for special offers. On balance transfers, for instance, look for offers with no transaction fees and zero percent interest for at least 12 months.
5. Balance computation method
If you're going to carry a balance, you need to consider how the finance charge is calculated. The most common method is average daily balance, which means that the daily balances are added together and then divided by the number of days in the billing cycle. Stay away from credit cards that compute the balance using two billing cycles; this winds up costing you more money in financing fees. There are plenty of cards that don't use it.
6. Incentives
Many card issuers offer reward programs to their customers to induce them to use the card. Assuming you're going to make the purchases anyway -- and the card issuer doesn't charge extra for the rewards program -- it can be a nice benefit. Look for a program that offers flexibility, such as cash or travel, and rewards you'll actually use, that are easily earned and redeemed, says Diana Don, director of financial education for card issuer Capital One. "Be mindful of various restrictions that come with some programs," she says. "Take note of whether rewards expire and if there are limits regarding how many points you can earn."

1. Build credit history: Charging small amounts and paying them off is a great way to establish credit history. Without credit history, it can be more difficult to get loans (including good loans such as car loans or a Mortage). If you are able to secure a loan without any credit history, your loan rate may be higher as a result.
2. Emergency source of funds: I mean for a real emergency. A real emergency fund is always best, but not everyone has EGP 10,000 cash to buy emergency airline tickets, make car repairs, deal with a natural disaster, etc. In such emergencies, you can always depend on your credit card and pay it off over few months.
3. Safety Paying with a credit card makes it easier to avoid losses from fraud. When your debit card is used fraudulently, the money is missing from your account instantly. Legitimate payments for which you've scheduled online payments or mailed checks may bounce, triggering insufficient funds fees and making your creditors unhappy. Late payments can also lower your credit score. It can take a while for the fraudulent transactions to be reversed and the money restored to your account while the bank investigates. By contrast, when your credit card is used fraudulently, you aren't out any money - you just notify your credit card company of the fraud and don't pay for the transactions you didn't make while the credit card company resolves the matter.
4. Internet Purchases Having a credit card can save you money on the items you purchase. Some of the best deals available are now found on the Internet. In many instances, the only way to pay for these Internet purchases is with a credit card. If you don't have a credit card, you may have to pay more for the exact same thing you could have purchased online, not to mention the extra cost of driving to get the item.
5. Rewards: Many credit cards offer rewards including cash back, airline miles, discounts, rebates, gift cards and many others. Most of these rewards are designed to get people hooked into using the cards or spending more than they would otherwise, but used properly, rewards points can earn you a lot of money.
6. Convenience: Many people don’t like to carry large amounts of cash. If they lose it, it’s gone. If it’s stolen, it’s gone. Credit cards are small, convenient, and carry better consumer protections. They are also convenient to use to buy things on-line, or to buy large ticket items. Another, convenience is travel. You do not need to carry a lot of cash and exchange as much currency. Some credit cards don’t even charge a foreign transaction fee.
7. Universal Acceptance Certain purchases are difficult to make with a debit card. When you want to rent a car or stay in a hotel room, you'll almost certainly have an easier time if you have a credit card. Rental car companies and hotels want customers to pay with credit cards because it can be easier to charge customers for any damage they cause to a room or a car this way. So if you want to pay for one of these items with a debit card, the company may insist on putting a hold of several hundred dollars on your account. Also, when you're traveling in a foreign country, merchants won't always accept your debit card as payment, even when it has a major bank logo on it.
8. Extended warranties: Many credit card companies provide extended warranties on items you purchase with their card. In some cases, the manufacturer’s warranties are doubled. That’s not a bad feature!
9. Short term loan: Credit cards usually have a grace period, after which your payment is due. This can be several weeks, which allows you to earn interest on purchases you have already made. While this may not be a big deal for a hundred dollars, if you charge a thousand pound every month and add it up over the course of a year, you can actually earn some decent money with this. With cash or debit cards, the money is immediately removed from your account and you do not earn any interest on it.
10. Budgeting tools: Most credit card companies provide detailed transaction logs which are easily downloaded into Quicken, Mint.com, or other free money management tools. This makes budgeting much easier to track and plan. Yes, it can be done with cash, but it is much more labor intensive. And time, as they say, is money.
The Bottom Line
If you already know how to use a credit card responsibly, you really shouldn't be using your debit card for anything other than ATM access. And if you don't know how to use a credit card responsibly, now you have even more incentive to improve your habits. Many benefits await those who opt to responsibly use credit instead of debit.

سعر الفائدة المتناقصة هو السعر المعبر عن التكلفة الحقيقية للقرض. 
كل قسط شهري بتدفعه، جزء منه بيكون لسداد أصل المبلغ و جزء لسداد الفوائد؛ لما البنك يستخدم الفايدة المتناقصة فهو بيحسب الفوايد كل شهر على أصل المبلغ المتبقي (بعد سدد جزء من الاصل) 
خلينا ناخد مثال : 10,000 جنيه قرض يسدد علي 4 شهور بسعر فائدة 20% سنويا (يعني 1.67% شهرياً - 20%/12) - القسط الشهري 2,605. يعني في الاربع شهور هتدفع فوائد 420 جنيه.
 
أما الفائدة المقطوعة أو البسيطة فهي فائدة محسوبة على أصل القرض طول فترة القرض الاعتبار أي سدد للأقساط و علشان كدة عادةً بتكون رقم أقل من الفائدة المتناقصة كنسبة بس مش بالضرورة كفايده مدفوعة فعلياً نوضحها بمثال : لو ال-10,000 جنيه دول فيه بنك عرض إنه يسلفنا ب-15% فايدة مقطوعة( يعني1.25% في الشهر) يبقى هندفع فوايد 10,000*1.25%*4 (شهور) يعني 500 جنيه غير أصل المبلغ طبعاً يبقى دفعنا فوايد أكتر في الحالة دي.
 
يعني اخليني بس في الفائدة المتناقصة ؟
 
برضه مش شرط - ممكن بنك يعرض فائدة مقطوعة و تكون أفضل ؛ المهم انك تقارن صح - دايماً قارن القسط الشهري و إجمالي تكلفة الاقتراض مش بس سعر الفائدة.